Simple Shifts

2015 North American Book Award Winner.  A must-read for anyone serious about growing as a leader and creating positive influence on others. Simple Shifts focuses on self-discovery with tools and exercises to overcome challenges, recognize strengths, and achieve important growth.

Terri Hughes Blog

The Power of Mentoring Circles

Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2014

We can all identify at least one leader who had a positive, significant and lasting impact acting as a mentor. Last month I had the pleasure of being invited to attend a mentoring circle hosted by a former client with a group of her management mentees in a large global company.   

Take Off Those Blinders

Posted on Monday, September 08, 2014

How often do you do or say things that create results just opposite of what you are trying to achieve?  

...Not My Fault

Posted on Monday, July 14, 2014

When things go ‘wrong’ it’s very human to want to assign blame - we think this helps us understand what happened in order to move forward but it also prevents us from seeing where we contributed to the situation. As long as it’s someone else’s fault, we can deny our own contribution.   We get busy focusing on other people’s shortcomings… and the more we look, the more we notice. Great way to avoid looking at ourselves! 

Harness your Hidden Strengths

Posted on Sunday, June 29, 2014

I’m a big believer in working from a strengths-based perspective with my clients – because when we focus on strengths we are more open to looking at ourselves in new ways to make positive change.  It’s the strengths that can help us make those changes. 

Stop Talking

Posted on Tuesday, May 06, 2014

Most of the leaders I coach freely admit they need to listen better (and more often!).  What I don’t hear is an admission of the need to talk less. So the first step is to recognize your own ‘talking’ and ‘telling’ behaviors with your team.

Gavin was a classic example of a leader who felt that strong directions were the best approach to get the job done.  He feared  his team would be unable to perform without his direction and lots of ‘telling’.

I asked him if he could stop talking in his next staff meeting and simply focus on listening to his team. He agreed and opened his staff meeting with a few issue-focused, open-ended questions. Then he listened. His staff members told him it was the best meeting they had ever had since they had an opportunity to discuss critical issues from their perspective.